Week Nine Just Fine

This is week #9 on clinical study, as I received my infusion of M7824 yesterday as planned. All of my pre-therapy vitals and bloodwork came back fine, which meant the treatment was a go. As with previous infusions, there were no issues during or after. Everything went just fine.

It was unfortunately a later night than expected, as Lorie and I just missed our 7:30pm train and had to catch one leaving the next hour. So, we ended up walking in the door at home around midnight. Could always be worse!

Following the discussion in my past few blog posts, I’ve been learning more about the concept of “pseudoprogression,” or the apparent growth of a tumor followed by sustained regression, which is common following treatment with checkpoint inhibitors. For example, I came across the video clip below by OncLiveTV that contains a discussion of “Pseudoprogression With Checkpoint Inhibitors in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer,” where panelists explore the implications of this phenomenon for patients with NSCLC. While I do not have NSCLC, the overall concept of pseudoprogression with checkpoint inhibitors is relevant to my treatment and latest scan results – whereby the tumor growth exhibited could be from inflammation due to an ongoing positive immune response, or from an actual increase in the tumor that continues until the body’s immune system overpowers the cancer. It could also be a combination of the aforementioned. In any event, I think that pseudoprogression is an important concept for patients receiving some immunotherapies to better understand – especially when getting imaging results following treatment.

 

PS – anyone who knows me, knows that I’m a big Chicago Cubs baseball fan (having grown up in Chicago)…so I’d be remiss if I didn’t ask you to keep voting for retired catcher David Ross on this season’s ‘Dancing with the Stars’. In case you missed his debut performance, here’s a clip where he danced to Steve Goodman’s “Go Cubs Go” – while wearing Cubs gear.

Collecting More Information

Following Tuesday’s news that several of the tumors in my lungs actually increased in size and a new spot appeared on my spleen, Lorie and I headed back to the NIH on Thursday for more tests to help better guide subsequent treatment decisions.

The first test was a CT image of my brain taken Thursday mid-afternoon, which would be used to rule out the spread of cancer to that particular organ. Patients with brain metastases are often excluded from clinical trials due to historically dismal survival and concerns about blood brain barrier drug penetration. Fortunately, we learned the next morning that this test came back negative for cancer progression to the brain.

The second test on Friday was an image-guided biopsy of a single lung nodule to help guide between cancer progression and inflammation as the reason for the increase in size seen on the recent CT scan on the lungs. In my case, a core needle biopsy was performed, which is less invasive than surgical biopsy and doesn’t require general anesthesia.

Early Friday morning, Dr. Elliot Levy, an interventional radiologists at NIH trained in radiology and minimally invasive procedures, met with us first to discuss the procedure. He pulled up a cross sectional image of my lungs, which showed several of the suspicious nodules.

CT scan of my lungs, showing target nodule for biopsy with two lines representing potential needle angles for biopsy. Other nodules within the lungs circled in red, which could be more dangerous to biopsy.

One in particular was located in the pleural cavity – normally a thin membrane that lines the surface of the lungs and the inside of the chest wall outside the lungs. In the bottom of my left lung, however, fluid built up in the pleural cavity where one of the nodules was located. Dr. Levy explained to us how this nodule could be biopsied without puncturing the lung lobe, which can result in a longer hospital stay.

Sometimes, a collapsed lung (pneumothorax) occurs after a lung biopsy.  As a precaution, a chest x-ray is taken after the procedure to check for this before sending the patient home.

After meeting with Dr. Levy, I was escorted back to the biopsy procedure room and placed on my right side on a table. I was consciously sedated, produced by the administration of two medications: a single dose of fentanyl given intravenously that can produce good analgesia for 20-45 minutes, and midazolam, which has a fast-acting, short-lived sedative effect when given intravenously, achieving sedation within one to five minutes and peaking within 30 minutes. The combination produces an altered level of consciousness that still allows a patient to respond to physical stimulation and verbal commands, and to maintain an unassisted airway. Midazolam is a primary choice for conscious sedation because it causes patients to have no recollection of the medical procedure.

Dr. Levy worked out of sight behind me to perform the biopsy, as he went through my back side. I was fairly nervous going into the procedure, but everything went extremely well with absolutely no pain or unexpected events due to the sedation.

After recovery, a subsequent chest x-ray confirmed that the lungs were indeed fine after the biopsy and we left NIH shortly thereafter to head back home to Pennsylvania.

Thumbs up; recovering after biopsy procedure at NIH

The preliminary results from the biopsy should be available early this week. If the biopsy shows ample evidence of immune stimulation, an argument could be made to stay on the current drug and that the “pseudoprogression,” or the initial radiologic appearance of an increase in tumor burden, might actually be inflammation and followed by tumor regression. A remote possibility in my type of cancer, but worth confirming.

Should the biopsy results instead demonstrate increased tumor burden, then we could consider switching to another investigational agent or even chemotherapy to shrink the tumors before proceeding again with one of the immunotherapy clinical trials.

Lorie and Michael Becker in front of cherry blossoms

Determined to stay positive, Lorie and I took advantage of the warm spring day on Thursday to stop outside NIH and snap a picture in front of some cherry blossoms. Unfortunately, snow and cold returned on Friday for the commute home.

We’ll know more this week, so stay tuned…