Final Day of Chemotherapy

Today was my last chemotherapy appointment. It was bittersweet watching the final drops of cisplatin fall from the bag, stream down the winding tubes, and finally enter the intravenous line into my vein.

On the positive side, I was able to complete all of the three cycles of chemotherapy that are associated with the encouraging survival rates published by the physicians at MSKCC. Some patients don’t make it through all three cycles due to side effects, and I was nervous earlier this week when I started running a fever that they may skip the last cycle.

On the negative side, the week following chemotherapy has been difficult for me in terms of nausea and a general sense of feeling crappy. On top of that, the doctors keep reminding me that the coming few weeks will be the toughest. This is due to the cumulative effects of both radiation and chemotherapy, as the two therapies continue to exert their toxic effects even after they are discontinued.

Michael Becker and Daughter Megan in the Chemotherapy Suite at MSKCC
Michael Becker and Daughter Megan in the Chemotherapy Suite at MSKCC

Fortunately, I was joined not only by Lorie but also my youngest daughter Megan. Megan was able to come to NYC thanks to Lorie’s best friend since 3rd grade of elementary school – Debby Novack. She came into town to help out after Lorie’s sister went back to Illinois after her three week tour of duty. Not an overly exciting day for Megan sitting around the chemotherapy suite and shuffling between various appointments, but it was great having her there.

The following two days (Thursday and Friday) are also my final days of radiation therapy. It will be so nice to have at least part of my life back next week – not having to be a slave to the daily treatments and the three chemotherapy cycles. Any remaining doctor appointments will simply be routine checkups leading up to a PET scan in approximately 3-4 months to determine in part whether or not the treatment was successful or if further intervention is needed.

Most important, my lower back pain has greatly subsided and I can get up and down much better than even a few days ago. Either the muscle spasm went away on its own or the myriad of pain medicines and muscle relaxers finally started working. Regardless, I’m happy and better positioned to deal with the coming weeks with one less ailment to worry about.

Treatment – Day One and Two

Yesterday (Jan 18) was my first day of therapy. As expected, it was bittersweet. On one hand, it felt great to finally get started with attacking the disease. The flip side is knowing what lurks around the corner in terms of side effects.

Michael Becker in chemotherapy lounge at MSKCC
Michael Becker in chemotherapy lounge at MSKCC (click to enlarge)

The day started at 8:45am with bloodwork and consultation with a nurse to answer any remaining questions. Next was two hours of intravenous fluids, an hour of intravenous anti-nausea medications and kidney protection medication, an hour of intravenous chemotherapy, and then two more hours of intravenous fluids. Of the six hour total infusion time, the four hours of fluids cover flushing out the kidneys, which are at risk for damage from the chemotherapy.

The time actually passed quickly. My wife and I chatted throughout, had a small lunch, checked emails, etc. Not quite a day at the spa, but no unpleasant surprises. It’s so great having her by my side! Luvya babe.

The fun wasn’t over yet. Next was a shuttle bus to the radiation center for that component of the therapy. The radiation treatment is only about ten minutes, but there is setup time, changing clothes, etc. that take up about an hour total.

You do not feel anything during the radiation treatment.  The side effects come later, so literally you leave day one feeling emotionally drained but physically fine. The worst part of radiation treatment is that darn mask! The confining nature of the mask and being pinned to the table is more of a mental challenge than anything else.

Today (Tue), I woke up early at 5am feeling wide awake, which can be a side effect from the steroids they gave me. However, a short while later I started to get a bit nauseous. It was disturbing to see the chemotherapy side effect so soon after treatment, but I took a pill for nausea they prescribed and felt better after about 30-minutes.

My wife and I stopped for breakfast and I was able to order my favorite banana toast meal from Bluestone Lane and had some coffee as well. We then headed over to MSKCC for day two of chemoradiation.

For the next few weeks, I won’t have to do the 5-6 hour chemotherapy. During that period, I “simply” have daily radiation Monday-Friday. Then, around week three I go through the same two-day chemotherapy with radiation and the process repeats. The total treatment cycle is 6-7 weeks.

The biggest epiphany so far is that commuting to New York daily for both treatment and work is likely going to be too much. As a result, I’m getting a temporary apartment in NY for the next few months. Not a cheap solution, but a necessary one – especially when side effects start to appear around week three or four. Fortunately, family has been there to help offset the added and unforseen expenses (thanks again!).

Lastly, to everyone that posts on my Facebook page, comments on this blog, emails, texts me on my phone, etc. – I can’t tell you how much it means to me. The kind notes and supportive words really do keep my spirits high. Thank you!