Back on Track

Bacterial cultures from the tips of two chest tubes that were recently removed revealed growth of a pseudomonas organism on one of them. These are fairly common pathogens involved in infections acquired in a hospital setting. Whether or not this was the source of my fevers, I was prescribed an antibiotic (levofloxacin, 500mg daily) since pseudomonas can lead to other nasty conditions.

I continued running fevers for a few days after starting the antibiotic, but was free of fever for the 48-hours leading up to my next scheduled chemotherapy round. Aside from the mystery fever, my blood counts have been good throughout the three weeks of chemotherapy that I received thus far. Accordingly, my medical oncologist (Dr. Pfister) supported resuming treatment.

Michael Becker receiving chemotherapy at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

On Tuesday, August 15, 2017, Lorie and I took the early morning train to NY so I could receive an intravenous infusion of paclitaxel and then carboplatin as planned. I was quite anxious to resume treatment after a one week break – especially after seeing the decrease in tumor size from the recent CT scan.

I looked at my blood test results from that morning and noticed my magnesium level was again low. Knowing that this “could” have played a role in the recent cardiac event, and that my daily oral magnesium isn’t keeping up, I requested an additional intravenous course of magnesium just to be safe and the medical staff agreed.

Michael Becker asleep on the Amtrak train home. Although my blood counts are okay, Lorie is appropriately cautious and likes me to wear a mask when on the train or in other public spaces.

The chemotherapy infusions went well and we were able to take an afternoon Amtrak train back home. Benedryl® is one of the pre-medications they give me, so I slept a good portion of the trip home. Lorie was kind enough to capture me asleep with her phone.

After postponing their prior trip due to my hospitalization, my sister and her family are planning to visit us this weekend. Hopefully life is uneventful and we all get to spend some time together.

It was surreal that exactly one week after being in the intensive care unit (ICU) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), I felt good enough to participate in a scheduled radio interview conducted in Philadelphia on August 10, 2017. Just goes to show there are good days and there are bad days. NPR member radio station WHYY host Dave Heller knew an awful lot about my book “A Walk with Purpose: Memoir of a Bioentrepreneur” and it was so great working with him during my first experience in a radio recording studio. Please take a moment to listen to a replay of this 20-minute segment and other events, along with reading newspaper and other media reprints, under the “In the News” menu tab at my memoir website by clicking here.

Michael Becker with WHYY’s Dave Heller. (WHYY photo)

Hopefully I continue to feel okay the next couple of days and look forward to seeing family while in town. It should take a week or so for the latest treatment effects to materialize. If not, however, I’m sure Humphrey will provide them with endless hours of amusement!

I would be remiss if I didn’t mention in closing that the start of the new school season is a great time to schedule an appointment with your pediatrician to talk about an important immunization that could prevent 6 cancers in boys/girls. You can learn more about this vaccine in an earlier blog post by clicking here. Had this vaccine been available when I was a child, it could have prevented the cancer that’s killing me. Start the discussion with your doctor – today! And help spread the word by using the #DiscussHPV hashtag in your social media posts.

Ending Up in the ICU

On Tuesday, August 1, 2017, I received my third dose of chemotherapy. Everything went well and the next day I was feeling excellent, although some of that can be contributed to the steroid pre-medication. As an added plus, I was looking forward to having family in town for the weekend. Life seemed pretty good.

In the back of my mind, I knew that I likely hadn’t reached the nadir, or lowest point, in my blood counts from the prior chemotherapy. As such, there was a possibility that I might not be feeling 100% for my visitors.

Sure enough, by Wednesday evening I started running a mild temperature. No big deal – it was below the 38 degrees Celsius (°C) cutoff for an “official” temperature. On Thursday I wasn’t feeling energetic and napped most of the day. Then the real fun started.

My temperature rose Thursday evening and the physician-on-call at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) recommended that I come to urgent care to get things checked out. So, Lorie and I made the drive from Bucks County, PA to New York City for the third visit to urgent care within the past three weeks! We debated taking the train as opposed to driving, which would have been faster.

By the time we arrived at MSKCC, my temperature was above 39 °C and I felt the familiar muscle aches and general fatigue that I associated with influenza. Coincidentally, it was the diagnosis of influenza during my first week of chemoradiation in early 2016 that resulted in my first trip to MSKCC’s urgent care facility.

Flu season doesn’t usually begin until October, so this time concern focused on bacterial infection. With my white blood cell counts negatively impacted by chemotherapy, it was possible that my body couldn’t fight off an infection in one of my chest tubes or another location.

I was triaged with the usual battery of blood tests and a chest x-ray before being placed in an exam room. Urgent care was very crowded and I was just happy to have a bed and looked forward to resting horizontally for a while.

I sat on the bed, preparing to relax when I clutched my chest from a sudden, stabbing pain. Lorie could tell from the expression on my face this was no ordinary situation and called for the nurse who arrived immediately to assess the situation. As various cables were connected, I felt my heart racing and Lorie was shocked to see my pulse was 225 on the computer monitor.

Normally, the heart beats about 60 to 100 times per a minute at rest. But in tachycardia, the heart beats faster than normal in the upper or lower chambers of the heart or both while at rest. The episode ended within a minute or so, but tachycardia can disrupt normal heart function and lead to serious complications, including heart failure, stroke, and sudden cardiac arrest or death. Patches were promptly applied outside of my chest wall, which could be used if needed to provide a brief electric shock to the heart to reset the heart rhythm back to its normal, regular pattern.

My heart wasn’t the only one racing as the medical team placed a crash cart outside my door and a sense of urgency filled the room. The contents of a crash cart vary, but typically contain the tools and drugs needed to treat a person in or near cardiac arrest. I was sure that the end was near.

Michael Becker in MSKCC’s ICU

Fortunately, no further cardiac events occurred and I was admitted to MSKCC’s intensive care unit (ICU), where seriously ill patients are cared for by specially trained staff. While I have never had the misfortune to be admitted to an ICU in the past, I was amazed by the both the medical staff and technology used to monitor my condition and knew I was in good hands.

I was placed on an antibiotic and medication to stabilize my heart rate while the team worked to determine the source of the tachycardia and whether or not my episode had caused any damage to my heart. Preliminary assessments ranged from one of my tumors or chest tubes rubbing up against the sensitive tissue surrounding the heart to low electrolyte levels, which are important minerals in your body that have an electric charge. Maintaining the right balance of electrolytes is key for your body’s blood chemistry, muscle action and other processes.

On Friday, my temperature returned to normal and there were no further cardiac events. Still, I couldn’t help but feel that perhaps it was time to contact hospice and let the cancer take its course. I had faced my share of obstacles since being diagnosed with cancer in late 2015 and three recent trips to the hospital resulted in further erosion of my quality of life with two chest tubes, being back on chemotherapy and its side effects, and now the prospect of potential cardiac issues. Lorie and I discussed the topic of hospice and she rightfully pointed out that such a decision shouldn’t be made while sitting in the ICU.

I shared my thoughts about hospice with one of nurses while he assisted me with walking a few laps around the floor. Much to my surprise, he shared with me that it was about 11-years ago that he underwent a bone marrow transplant at MSKCC and how it caused him to pursue a career in medicine. He discounted my outlook on hospice, stating that I was young, up-and-walking, and seemed otherwise quite capable of enjoying further quality time with my wife and daughters. When my quality of life truly diminishes, that would be the time to consider hospice.

Our daughters, Rosie and Megan, traveled by train to NYC and were able to visit me briefly in the ICU. However, they all stayed overnight in a nearby hotel thanks to my father and step-mother. Being in the ICU wasn’t conducive for the planned family visit, which unfortunately got cancelled.

I was released from the ICU to a regular room very late Friday evening. I’ll be here for at least another day or two because the source of the fever still hasn’t been identified. With the fever gone, it appears the antibiotics were successful in treating the infection, but without knowing the source or strain – treatment can be challenging.

Viewing my Twitter feed briefly from the ICU on Friday, I was delighted to learn that Adam Feuerstein, Senior Writer at STAT News (statnews.com), Tweeted that he was dedicating his Pan-Mass Challenge ride to me.

Adam Feuerstein’s Tweet

Each year the Pan-Mass Challenge brings together thousands of impassioned cyclists, committed volunteers, generous donors and dedicated corporate sponsors. Together, they strive to provide Dana-Farber’s doctors and researchers the necessary resources to discover cures for all types of cancer.

“Michael, we love you, support you. Your strength will inspire me tomorrow.,” Tweeted Adam. Well, Adam, your Tweet and the many acknowledgements on Twitter helped brighten my day and I’m still here giving cancer everything that I’ve got. Godspeed on your ride and thank you for an amazing gesture!

And special thanks to all of Lorie’s friends who have helped our daughters get to NYC and/or babysit our small petting zoo while we’re away. It’s a lot to ask, and we’re so grateful for the help since it is one less thing to worry about. Humphrey appears to have made new puppy friends, as evidenced by the photos and videos that I love seeing.

It’s Saturday afternoon as I finish writing this blog update. Lorie, Rosie, and Megan are able to visit longer since I’m in a regular room now. Seeing people in the hospital isn’t tops on most teen’s lists of favorite activities, but it means so much to me having them here.

Damned If I Do, Damned If I Don’t

As discussed in my prior blog post, the recent CT scan at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) didn’t turn out as we had hoped. Not only did the cancer show signs of progressing, but a blot clot was also found in my left iliac artery near my pelvis.

Blood clot illustration

I had been on Lovenox (enoxaparin) for just under one week, when I noticed that the daily drainage from my chest tube looked much more like blood than the usual straw color. Equally disconcerting, the volume of drainage was greater than usual.

At the suggestion of my treating physicians, we stopped at the emergency room at a local hospital in Bucks County (which will remain nameless) on Sunday morning around 10am simply to have a complete set of blood work done. The concern being that the loss of so much blood via the chest tube could necessitate a transfusion.

Fortunately, my hemoglobin levels were okay (low hemoglobin count may indicate you have anemia) and a transfusion wasn’t needed. However, a big problem remained – finding the cause of bleeding coming from my pleural effusion and how to stop it.

One thing was almost certain – the anticoagulant Lovenox likely played a role. Discontinuing Lovenox could help reverse the bleeding, but I would be left with an untreated blood clot that could cause major problems if it moved from its current location. Damned if i do, damned if i don’t.

Quite the conundrum and not one to take lightly. As such, after waiting around the local hospital until early evening with no solutions, nurses, or physicians in sight, Lorie took control and requested that I be immediately discharged. Shortly thereafter she drove us to New York City to visit Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). I already had an appointment scheduled with my medical oncologist (Dr. David Pfister) for Tuesday to discuss possible next-steps for treatment, such as chemotherapy, and the drive to NYC is shorter than going to the NIH in Bethesda, MD.

We arrived after midnight, but the urgent care team at MSKCC promptly assessed my condition. More blood work was drawn along with a chest x-ray and CT scan. Simply looking at the chest x-ray, I could tell that the pleural effusion was quite large. This shouldn’t be the case, as I drain it daily.

For now, stopping the internal bleeding is more important than addressing the blood clot – although both issues require immediate attention. I’ve already discontinued the Lovenox and the MSKCC team will assess various options to access and drain the large amount of fluid still trapped in my left lung. The impact of the fluid is not insignificant, as I am short of breath walking short distances or up/down stairs. Coughing also has gotten worse and leads to feeling light-headed or dizzy.

Assuming the pleural effusion can be controlled, the next step would be to deal with the blood clot. One solution is to place a filtering device in the Inferior Vena Cava (IVC, a large vein in the abdomen that returns blood from the lower body to the heart) that could help prevent a pulmonary embolism, which is fatal in one-third of patients who suffer from it. The filter essentially traps blood clots and prevents them from reaching the lungs or heart.

Of course, aside from the aforementioned, I am interested in exploring potential new treatment options and look forward to upcoming physician appointments. Until then, I’ve been admitted to MSKCC for at least a day or two and will provide any meaningful updates via Twitter, etc.

It Could Always Be Worse

After a full day of activities yesterday, Lorie and I decided to grab an early dinner in Bethesda, MD at a restaurant recommended to us. We really haven’t explored much of the local establishments, so it was nice to venture out and try something new.

We sat down and I immediately focused on the cheese appetizer selection and ordered three different types. Half way through the appetizer, however, my cell phone rang. It was Dr. Strauss from the NIH.

I could tell from the initial line of questioning (are you still at NIH, where are you now, are you alone, etc.) that bad news would shortly follow. Sure enough, yesterday’s CT scan revealed a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) on the left side of my pelvis and Dr. Strauss requested that we promptly return to NIH to start treatment with Lovenox (enoxaparin). With that, we paid our restaurant bill and left our dinners behind to take an Uber back to NIH.

VIDEO CAPTION: 3D CT image from NIH showing tumor locations highlighted in green. The largest mass (lower right) is from my spleen.

Both Dr. Gulley and Dr. Strauss met us back at NIH in the day hospital and we went to an empty treatment room to talk in private. Unfortunately, the blood clot was merely a sideshow for the bigger news, which was that several tumors increased in size from the prior scan taken 6-weeks ago. For the first time, my outlook was black & white: the cancer was winning the tug-of-war with my body’s immune system. Receiving further treatment with the experimental agent M7824 would be hard to justify and more aggressive treatment, such as chemotherapy, appeared to be the favored next step.

After a brief tutorial on self-injecting Lovenox twice daily, we returned to the hotel and planned on meeting early the next morning to review the CT scans and have further discussion. The mood was somber and neither one of us slept very well.

Michael and Lorie Becker reviewing CT images with Drs. James Gulley and Les Folio of NIH. Photo credit: Daniel Sone of NCI

The NIH is only one of two places to have advanced imaging technology that was truly fascinating and dramatically improves the ability to visualize and follow specific tumors over time. Personally, I was amazed by the progress radiology has made since I last reviewed such images. We were engrossed in discussion about the various images displayed on the three monitor screens when Lorie’s phone rang. It was our oldest daughter Rosie.

The first few calls were easy to dismiss since we were in an important meeting, but then came a text – “emergency.” Driving home from class, Rosie apparently veered into the lane of oncoming traffic and hit another car going 30-40 MPH. All of the airbags deployed and the car is totaled. She was taken to the local hospital for x-rays, but nothing was broken and she was released. We understand the driver of the other car is okay as well.

Immediately, my mind wandered from my own mortality being visualized on the computer screens to how Rosie’s accident could have been far, far worse – perhaps even fatal. I’m not sure exactly how I would have reacted to that news on top of my disease update, but I do know it would pale by comparison to my own situation.

On more than one occasion, Lorie and I have uttered the words “it could always be worse.” Lately, it has been harder and harder to make that statement. However, with Rosie largely unharmed in what could have been disastrous, today definitely could have been worse.

I will blog more about my condition and treatment options in future posts after digesting all of the information from the past 48-hours. In the meantime, with no infusion of M7824 today, we are on the train home to be with Rosie.

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Thankful for Cancer?

In recent blog posts, I discussed my interest in trying new things, such as transcendental meditation, acupuncture, sound therapy, etc. I connected with other terminal cancer patients and found that some of them were pursuing similar avenues.

Through these interactions, I was introduced and started reading The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying by Sogyal Rinpoche, Patrick D. Gaffney, and Andrew Harvey (thank you @StacieChevrier). I haven’t read much of the book yet, but so far it is chock full of valuable insights and memorable quotes. For example:

“Tibetan Buddhists believe that illnesses like cancer can be a warning, to remind us that we have been neglecting deep aspects of our being, such as our spiritual needs. If we take this warning seriously and change fundamentally the direction of our lives, there is a very real hope for healing not only our body, but our whole being.”

The quote implies that cancer could actually be a good thing. Similarly, in the past I’ve come across posts from other cancer survivors talking about the various ways they were actually “thankful” for getting cancer. I must admit, at the time I found such notions absolutely ludicrous. I certainly wasn’t thankful for having cancer. F@ck cancer!

However, I am starting to perhaps better understand and appreciate the nature of such remarks. For example, as stated in the quote above “…cancer can be a warning, to remind us that we have been neglecting deep aspects of our being.”

In the past, I was very skeptical of meditation, acupuncture, and other spiritual needs. Cancer opened my eyes to at least try new techniques, and now I am a believer and realize the void that they can fill.

By writing and publishing my memoir A Walk with Purpose along with my photography book Strength, Confidence & Beauty: A Collection of Female Portraits, I learned a lot about myself and my life’s journey. Tackling these activities were always in the back of my mind, but somehow there was never enough time to focus on them. Cancer provided both the motivation and a sense of urgency.

Left to right: Michael, Sheff, Brad (and, of course, Humphrey). Click to enlarge.

Through my cancer diagnosis, I also started connecting with amazing individuals and received overwhelming support from mere acquaintances to complete strangers. Just yesterday, a few of my Twitter buddies (@bradloncar and @SheffStation) made the long trip to rural Pennsylvania just to spend some quality time together. To be fair, it’s completely possible they just came to see our new adorable puppy Humphrey – but, hey, I’ll still take it. (In all seriousness, many thanks to Brad, Sheff, and others that have visited in recent weeks and months!)

I learned to “live in the moment,” appreciate the little things, and slow my life down a bit. Of course, some of this didn’t come by choice, but rather the diminished energy and fatigue of battling cancer.

Before cancer, I was wandering aimlessly with no real goal in life other than a desire for material wealth. Now, I am on a mission – to raise awareness of the human papillomavirus (HPV) and its link to six different cancers with the hope of getting more children vaccinated so they don’t suffer my same fate. I am someone with a deep motivation, a purpose in life, a definite direction, and an overpowering conviction that there will be a reward at the end of it all.

And so, I asked myself: “Am I thankful for getting cancer?” At this point, the fears and future uncertainties prevent me from answering with a resounding “yes.” But, I am warming up to the idea that cancer has changed me for the better, and for that – it is hard not to be thankful.

Help Eradicate Six Cancers Caused by HPV

As a sexually transmitted disease, discussions surrounding human papillomavirus (HPV) can understandably be uncomfortable and/or embarrassing. Interestingly, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), HPV is so common that nearly ALL sexually active men and women get the virus at some point in their lives. About 79 million Americans (~25% of the U.S. population) are currently infected with some type of HPV. About 14 million people in the United States become newly infected each year. Accordingly, I thought that a more detailed blog post on the subject was warranted.

HPV is a virus with the ability to infect skin and mucous membranes, or mucosa, that lines various cavities in the body and surrounds internal organs. It can cause normal cells in infected areas to turn abnormal. Most of the time, you cannot see or feel these cell changes. In the majority of cases, the body fights off the HPV infection naturally and infected cells then go back to normal.

There are approximately 179 distinct HPV genotypes, which can be divided into “low risk” and “high risk” groups based on their capacity to drive cancer transformation. Most people with HPV never develop symptoms or health problems; 9 out of 10 HPV infections go away by themselves within two years. Sometimes HPV infections will last longer and can cause certain cancers, warts, and other diseases. There is currently no test to find out a person’s “HPV status.”

The “high risk” HPV subtypes most clearly implicated in cancer are HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45, 51, 52, and 56, which are capable of causing cancers of the cervix, head and neck, anus, vagina, vulva, and penis. Every year in the United States, HPV causes 30,700 such cancers in men and women.

Most of the time, people get HPV from having vaginal and/or anal sex with an infected partner. In fact, “genital HPV” is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the U.S.

However, the same types of HPV that infect the genital areas can also infect the mouth and throat. HPV found in the mouth and throat is called “oral HPV.” Only a few studies have looked at how people get oral HPV, and some of these studies show conflicting results. Some studies suggest that oral HPV may be passed on during oral sex (from mouth-to-genital or mouth-to-anus contact) or simply open-mouthed (“French”) kissing, others have not. The likelihood of getting HPV from kissing or having oral sex with someone who has HPV is not known. According to the CDC, more research is needed to understand exactly how people get and give oral HPV infections.

Oral HPV is about three times more common in men than in women. Overall, HPV types 2, 4, 6, 11, 13 and 32 have been associated with benign oral lesions while HPV types 16 and 18 have been associated with malignant lesions, especially in cancers of the tonsils and elsewhere in the oropharynx. The most commonly implicated subtype in oropharyngeal cancer is HPV16, accounting for over 80% of HPV positive cases. Not surprisingly, my initial biopsy results showed that tumor cells were positive for HPV16.

Patients with oral HPV cancer present at a younger age and are less likely to partake in excess alcohol consumption or heavy tobacco use that are associated with corresponding HPV-negative cancers. Additionally, HPV-related tumors more frequently arise in the oropharynx – the part of the throat at the back of the mouth behind the oral cavity. It includes the back third of the tongue, the soft palate, the side and back walls of the throat, and the tonsils (where my cancer started). Smoking-related tumors arise more commonly in the oral cavity, larynx, or hypopharynx.

Oral HPV tumors are more likely to be smaller and poorly differentiated, with a higher incidence of advanced lymph node metastases in comparison to HPV negative tumors. Despite a more aggressive clinical presentation, HPV status is the best independent predictor of survival in these patients.

Signs and symptoms of oral HPV may include persistent sore throat, earaches, hoarseness, enlarged lymph nodes, pain when swallowing, and unexplained weight loss. In my case, the first sign of disease in November 2015 was an enlarged (3-4cm) lymph node on the right side of my neck where the cancer had spread from my right tonsil. Some people have no signs or symptoms.

While there is currently no cure for the virus, there are commercially available prophylactic vaccines against HPV available today: the bivalent (HPV16 and 18) Cervarix®, the tetravalent (HPV6, 11, 16 and 18) Gardasil®, and newer Gardasil 9 (HPV6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, 58). Since the HPV subtype 16 was included in each of these vaccines, and this subtype was found in my tumor cells, it is very likely that my cancer could have been prevented had such vaccines been available to me when I was younger.

The HPV vaccine was initially developed to prevent cervical and other less common genital cancers, which raised questions regarding the ability to also prevent oral cancers. In one of the first large studies to explore the possible impact of HPV vaccination on oral HPV infections, researchers found it may confer a high degree of protection. The study of young adults in the U.S. showed that the prevalence of high-risk HPV infection was 88% lower among those who reported getting at least one vaccine dose than among those who were not vaccinated. Researchers reported the results at the recent American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2017 annual meeting.

To be an effective preventive strategy, HPV vaccination should start before “sexual puberty.” The CDC recommends routine HPV vaccination for girls and boys at age 11 or 12 (two doses six months apart, a 2016 revision of guidelines that previously recommended three doses). People who get vaccinated later (up to age 26 for young women and up to age 21 for young men) will need three.

The same research reported at ASCO 2017 found that from 2011 through 2014 fewer than 1 in 5 (18.3%) young adults in the U.S. reported receiving at least one dose of the HPV vaccine before age 26. The vaccination rate was much lower among men than women (6.9% vs. 29.2%) at this time.

“The HPV vaccine has the potential to be one of the most significant cancer prevention tools ever developed, and it’s already reducing the world’s burden of cervical cancers,” said ASCO President-Elect Bruce E. Johnson, MD, FASCO. “The hope is that vaccination will also curb rising rates of HPV-related oral and genital cancers, which are hard to treat. This study confirms that the HPV vaccine can prevent oral HPV infections, but we know it only works if it’s used.”

More research is needed to understand exactly how people get and give oral HPV infections that resulted in my oropharyngeal cancer. Recent studies confirm that the HPV vaccine can prevent such oral HPV infections, but only when they are used – and vaccination rates are extremely low. This is disappointing, as vaccination is widely considered one of the greatest medical achievements of modern civilization. Childhood diseases that were commonplace less than a generation ago are now increasingly rare because of vaccines (although the measles are making a comeback since elimination was first documented in the U.S. in 2000). In order to be effective at eliminating communicable diseases, vaccines must be administered to sufficient levels of persons in the community.

If you have a son or daughter, please talk to your doctor about the HPV vaccine. HPV has become a recognized driver of six cancers affecting more than 30,000 people each year, yet there are available vaccines to prevent the majority (about 28,000) of these cases from ever occurring.

 

Sources:

American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2017. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2017.

From HPV-positive towards HPV-driven oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas. Cancer Treat Rev. 2015 Oct 31.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Statistics

J Clin Oncol 35, 2017 (suppl; abstr 6003)

Puppy Power

I am often asked how I stay upbeat and positive in the face of a terminal cancer diagnosis. Keeping busy/distracted and trying new things are definitely key pieces of advice I would offer fellow survivors.

Recently, I started acupuncture and sound therapy with Sharon Czebotar. I was skeptical about acupuncture until being offered the service while inpatient at the NIH. I found the therapy helped with appetite, neuropathy, and more, which convinced me to search out a local expert. Sharon has been simply amazing and she also recommended a separate class on transcendental meditation, which I start next weekend.

Of course, writing has also been cathartic for me. With my memoir now published (phew!), I can focus again on updating this blog more frequently.

Michael Becker holding a 7-week old golden retriever puppy

Whenever my wife Lorie or I start getting a little depressed or down, she redirects the conversation to “happier topics” – and quickly rattles off puppies, kittens, rainbows, and unicorns. Of the four options, I found puppies the easiest to embrace and acquire. So, next weekend we pickup an 8-week old golden retriever puppy to add to our small zoo.

Other than getting one of the 4 males out of the litter of 11 puppies, we don’t know which one will get his forever home with us as of yet. However, we’ve visited the litter on three separate occasions and to be honest – they all seem great.

Let’s face it…you would have to try REALLY hard not to smile with a puppy licking your ear.