Pathology Results

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This afternoon, I received a call from my ENT confirming what I had already known or suspected – based on the biopsy results I had cancer.  In particular, squamous cell carcinoma.  Doctors describe cancer by its grade (G), which describes how much cancer cells look like healthy cells when viewed under a microscope. If the cancerous tissue looks very different from healthy tissue, it is called poorly differentiated or a high-grade tumor. The cancer’s grade can help the doctor predict how quickly the cancer will spread. In general, the lower the tumor’s grade (such as G1 or G2), the better the prognosis. In my case, unfortunately the cells were poorly differentiated (G3 or G4).

The cancer was in the enlarged lymph node, but that was only one of the locations where it had spread.  We needed to know where the cancer originated.  Based upon a review of the various markers evidenced in the pathology report, I grew increasingly concerned that the cancer started in my lungs.  The next step was to perform a PET/CT scan to reveal the primary source of the disease.

Review CT results with ENT

IMG_6876At the physician’s office, the CD took a while to load on his laptop.  I suggested that while we were waiting for the images to load, perhaps we could discuss the accompanying radiology report.  I knew that the radiologist would provide a written assessment of his/her findings, so I wanted to get straight to the results.  My physician, however, excused himself for a bit since the CD was taking a while to load and to me, this was another red flag of bad news to come.  When he returned a short while later, the discussion centered around the enlarged lymph node and the fact that it “may” show evidence of necrosis at the center. I was more certain than ever that I had cancer and based on everything I read it was likely squamous cell carcinoma.  The real question was where the cancer originated – my lungs? The next step was to biopsy the enlarged lymph node to obtain more information through a procedure known as fine needle aspiration.

The physician injected novocaine directly into the enlarged mass prior to inserting a needle twice to extract fluid from the area.  He remarked that not a lot of fluid was easily obtained, which helped rule out to some extent the possibility of a cyst.  Once again, all arrows pointed to cancer.  The novocaine injection was the most painful aspect of the procedure, with the minor exception of some discomfort towards the end of the second needle stick.  The physician laid out a series of glass slides on the counter an applied the contents from the syringe onto them all.  That was it; now to wait for the pathology report.  Much to my chagrin, the doctor indicated that it could be up to a week to receive the report.  More waiting!  I wasn’t sleeping at night, so I was prescribed Ativan (lorazepam) to take before bed.

CT Scan

PET/CT scanI’m not usually claustrophobic, but even the open nature of the CT scan made me a bit uneasy.  The CT involved iodinated contrast, which is a form of intravenous radiocontrast (radiographic dye) containing iodine to enhance the visibility of vascular structures and organs during radiographic procedures.

Immediately following my CT scan, I received a CD with the results.  In view of my background with radiopharmaceutical companies – I loaded the CD in my computer to try and peak at the results.  Unfortunately, the CD was only for Windows computers and I only had access to a Mac. Nonetheless, I had a general idea of what wouldn’t be a good sign – such as a dark center in the enlarged lymph node, which could indicate necrosis.

Initial Visit with ENT

endoscopeThe antibiotics did nothing to alter the size of the lateral neck mass, which prompted a visit to an ENT.  At this point, I was 100% convinced that I had cancer based on everything that I read.  The only question was what “type” of cancer and its stage.  After spraying my nasal cavity with a numbing agent, the physician looked at my throat using an endoscope (e.g., examining my throat using a tiny, flexible camera inserted through the nasal cavity) that didn’t seem to indicate anything out of the ordinary.  The next logical step was a CT scan to obtain additional information, which I promptly scheduled.

Discovery – Day Zero

401779-smallIt was the day before Thanksgiving and I was waiting for the water to heat up before getting into the shower.  Glancing at my reflection in the mirror, I noticed that the right side of my neck looked a bit larger than the other side.  Placing my hand on my neck, I could easily feel an unusual lump just under my jaw line that clearly wasn’t there the day before.  It was a solid mass and wasn’t sore at all to the touch.  A quick search on Google made me nervous enough to reach out to my general physician and they were kind enough to get me in that afternoon.  I’m not generally a pessimistic person, but I had already prepared myself for either lymphoma or head/neck cancer.

Remarking that he could sense the level of concern on our faces, the physician suggested that the lump was a blocked salivary gland and that such a condition could be either painful or not.  He prescribed an antibiotic (levofloxacin, 500mg) and stated that the lump should decrease after a few days unless there was a stone or other obstruction causing the blockage.  In any event, I was to follow-up with him around Monday unless there was severe pain or discomfort in which case I could consider going to the emergency room over the weekend.  In the back of my mind, I was still convinced we were dealing with something different. As stated in the peer-reviewed literature, “More than 75% of lateral neck masses in patients older than 40 years are caused by malignant tumours, and the incidence of neoplastic cervical adenopathy continues to increase with age.”¹

¹ Gleeson M, Herbert A, Richards A. Management of lateral neck masses in adults. BMJ : British Medical Journal. 2000;320(7248):1521-1524.