Back in early August 2017, I had my two chest catheters removed during one of my many hospital visits during the summer. While insertion of both devices was done under twilight anesthesia, the medical professionals who arrived at my room explained that lidocaine injections would hurt more than the actual extraction – so no local anesthesia would be used.

Figure 1: My Aspira catheter exit site seen as the larger, red area (click to view larger image)

I had two different catheters in my body. The first one was an Aspira® catheter, which was in my body approximately four months. The second was a PleurX® catheter that was used for a much shorter period.

Since the removal of both catheters, I’ve had issues with the area between where the Aspira catheter was inserted and the exit site (see Figure 1). The area was often sore and red, which got gradually worse during the past two months. This week, the exit site became raised and fluid started oozing from the previously healed exit incision.

Figure 2: Aspira catheter diagram (click to view larger image)

To help keep the catheter tube in place, a retention cuff is used to facilitate tissue in-growth (see Figure 2). Accordingly, the catheter must be surgically removed by first freeing the cuff from the tissue, then by pulling the catheter out gently and smoothly.

Yesterday, an ultrasound imaging procedure revealed that the Aspira cuff was left behind and was the source of my discomfort. There was no surgical procedure used in the removal of my Aspira catheter back in August and therefore the cuff, which became quite attached to my body, didn’t want to leave.

Figure 3: Michael Becker in surgical suite

Fortunately, I was able to see a surgical team late yesterday as well. After assessing the situation, they were able squeeze me in for a procedure. First, they numbed the area with lidocaine injections and then retrieved the rogue Aspira cuff. It was a quick procedure.

I’ll have plenty of time to rest, as my blood counts were once again too low for chemotherapy this week. Next week is my normal week off from chemo as well, so my next round of therapy should be on November 7th.

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Join the conversation! 4 Comments

  1. Never a full moment, lol. Glad you’re feeling better!

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  2. Enjoy the week off! Carpe diem and be well!

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  3. This is something you surely didn’t need and should not have happened. I hope you are feeling better and that you have an enjoyable weekend!

    Reply
  4. Big oops on the part of the medical pros! Glad you were able to find the source of your discomfort though👍🏻

    Reply

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