Snake Eyes

It seems as though each time I make an optimistic blog post, something goes wrong. Since my last post was titled “Lucky Seven,” it seemed appropriate to keep with the gambling theme and title this one “Snake Eyes.” For those unfamiliar with the term, a throw of two ones with a pair of dice results in the lowest possible score, and by extension the term is also used to reference bad luck¹.

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Snake Eyes

Today was supposed to be the start of my final round of chemotherapy, with the second and final day on Tuesday. Sunday night, however, I started running a temperature of 102 degrees Fahrenheit that prompted my second trip to the urgent care center at MSKCC over the weekend. The obvious concerns being influenza, bacterial infection, etc. that would delay receiving chemotherapy.

After a variety of tests, influenza and infection were ruled out. While it is possible to run a low grade temperature from daily radiation, a high temperature such as mine is unexpected. This left all of us wondering what was causing my fever and why it was so high. Since there was no immediate cause for concern, they decided not to admit me overnight and said that I could use Tylenol for the fever. They acknowledged that it was unlikely I’d be receiving chemotherapy on Monday.

The next day (Monday) I saw Nicole – the nurse practitioner. I could tell she was on the fence proceeding with chemotherapy that day given that my temperature was again above 100 degree Fahrenheit. She conferred with Dr. David Pfister my medical oncologist and they opted to be cautious and postpone chemotherapy by one day. The only good news is that this shouldn’t change my final day of chemoradiation therapy which is this Friday.

Around the time of my daily radiation treatment, my temperature had dropped to low grade and I’m hopeful that we can continue with chemotherapy tomorrow morning. Separate from having cancer or receiving treatment, my lower back pain continues to be a problem so they switched me to some stronger opioid medications. I’m not talking minor pain or discomfort – but rather debilitating pain making it tough to get out of bed or getting up from a sitting position. I’ve experienced lower back pain issues in the past, but they usually only last a day or two and aren’t this severe.

It’s the final stretch and I “should” be done with therapy this Friday, so I’m trying not to complain. Hopefully these are just minor speed bumps on the road to Friday and then recovery. Until then, keep those thoughts, prayers, and good vibes coming!

¹ http://wordsmith.org/words/snake_eyes.html

 

Lucky Seven

This Monday is the start of Week #7 of my chemoradiation treatment. It is also the last week of treatment! It consists of two (2) days of chemotherapy on Monday and Tuesday and five (5) days of radiation Monday through Friday (5+2=7). With the prominence of lucky number seven, I’m hoping that the final week is uneventful and my recovery can slowly begin over the following weeks.

Why is “lucky seven” the world’s favorite number? There are seven days of the week, seven colors of the rainbow, seven notes on a musical scale, seven seas and seven continents¹.

Week #6 was relatively uneventful – at least as it relates to my cancer treatment. The frequent hydration during the week lowered my creatinine levels, which correlates with improving kidney function.

Michael Becker asleep with iPhone in hand at the urgent care center at MSKCC.

Michael Becker asleep with iPhone in hand.

In fact, the biggest issue for me this past week was throwing out my back. This isn’t cancer or treatment related, which was confirmed when I stopped by the urgent care center at MSKCC. I was a bit nervous since back pain can also be a sign of kidney issues, but all the tests came back fine. They prescribed some good pain medications and a muscle relaxer, which caused me to fall asleep while on my iPhone as you can see in the funny photo in this post captured by Lorie.

The likely culprit for my back pain was the mattress in our temporary apartment which is a good deal softer than the one we have at home. The folks at Furnished Quarters have been really great during our stay and they promptly replaced the mattress when we asked.

Thanks again to everyone taking the time to read this blog and for all the thoughts, prayers, and good vibes.

¹ Read more: Why ‘lucky 7’ really is the world’s magic number at: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2601281/Why-lucky-7-really-magic-number.html

Visit Home Cut Short

A repeat of my bloodwork confirmed that the elevated serum creatinine levels were a concern regarding my kidney function, so the physicians ordered more intravenous hydration with saline and potassium to flush them out. As mentioned in my prior post, this is a common issue with chemotherapy (cisplatin).

They originally wanted to do the hydration Friday late afternoon. Unfortunately, that would have interfered with my getting back to Pennsylvania in time to see Megan before her Freshman formal dance. After explaining the situation, they came up with the solution of hydrating Saturday instead. While this would allow me to see Meg, it made for a short trip to Pennsylvania before heading back to NYC.

Michael And Megan Becker photographed by Saron Mastrosimone

Michael And Megan Becker photographed by Sharon Mastrosimone

It was definitely worth the short trip. Our friend and fellow photographer Sharon Mastrosimone was kind enough to come over and take pictures before the dance. The image in this blog post is one of my favorites and alone made the night worthwhile. Many thanks Sharon!

So, here I sit at MSKCC with Lorie getting hydration on a Saturday afternoon instead of being back home in Pennsylvania. But I’m doing it with a smile on my face looking at pictures from last night. Megan looked beautiful and I’m so glad I was able to be there.

Radiation Dermatitis

During Week #5, another common side effect from chemoradiation treatment emerged – radiation dermatitis. Just like oral mucositis discussed in a prior post, radiation dermatitis is graded on a scale – with Grade 1 being mild and Grade 4 being severe. In most patients, radiation dermatitis is mild to moderate (grades 1 and 2), but ∼20%–25% of patients experience severe reactions¹.

Photo of Michael Becker's neck with mild/moderate radiation dermatitis.

Photo of Michael Becker’s neck with mild/moderate radiation dermatitis.

Right now, I have mild to moderate radiation dermatitis on my neck in the area that is being targeted. This is characterized by mild erythema (red rash), which you can see in the accompanying image. The more severe forms of radiation dermatitis are associated with itchy, peeling skin and ultimately open wounds and ulceration. I’m hoping that my condition doesn’t advance to those stages.

The treatment for radiation dermatitis is basically keeping the skin moist by applying Aquaphor ointment. No creams or ointments have shown superior efficacy over another in randomized clinical trials.  This includes topical steroids and other agents.

Other than that, there is some indication that my kidney function might be impaired due to elevated serum creatinine levels. They are still running more tests, but worse case would be more frequent intravenous hydration to flush out the kidneys. Kidney function can be negatively impacted by the chemotherapy (cisplatin).

I did have intravenous hydration today and have been feeling pretty good overall. Fatigue is still my major complaint, but also par for the course.

¹ Consensus guidelines for the management of radiation dermatitis and coexisting acne-like rash in patients receiving radiotherapy plus EGFR inhibitors for the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Ann Oncol (2008) 19 (1): 142-149. doi: 10.1093/annonc/mdm400. First published online: September 4, 2007

Steady As It Goes

The second round of chemotherapy and end of Week #4 was relatively uneventful – especially when compared with the first cycle when I came down with the flu. The biggest changes are increased taste alteration and fatigue.

Michael Becker Receiving IV Hydration

Michael Becker Receiving IV Hydration

My heart rate and blood pressure were elevated this week, so my physician ordered an extra 2-hour intravenous hydration session. Frankly, I was happy to do so – as I planned on coming home to Pennsylvania for the extended weekend.

I took the train home on Friday afternoon, but spent most of the day on Saturday sleeping which isn’t like me at all. I’m not normally one to take naps, but the fatigue from radiation and chemotherapy makes it hard to even keep my eyes open at times. I feel like I’m sleeping the entire weekend away!

Lorie’s sister Maureen is in town for a few weeks and has been a tremendous help around the house. She’s also a great cook and has been making some fabulous meals, although I just haven’t been up to eating them and have very little appetite. However, Lorie and the kids are enjoying them.

Sunday (today) is Lorie’s birthday in addition to being Valentine’s Day, which is another reason why I really wanted to make it home this weekend. I definitely owe her a proper celebration after we are past the cancer treatment, but in the meantime it will be nice to have a small celebration at home.

Monday starts Week #5 and it looks like March 4th will be my last radiation session. From what the doctors tell me, this is where things start to get rough with the treatment. Accordingly, I’m a bit nervous about what the coming days/weeks will bring…

Second Round of Chemotherapy

Today was the start of week #4 for my chemoradiation treatment. It was also the second time that I was scheduled to receive chemotherapy (cisplatin) in addition to my daily radiation treatment. I receive a total of three chemotherapy treatments – one at the beginning, one in the middle, and then one at the end of my therapy.

Fortunately, I felt well enough last Friday to come home to Pennsylvania for the weekend. It was great to see my wife and kids, pets, and sleep in my own bed for the second weekend in a row. I was really glad I could make it, since I missed being with Rosie for her 18th birthday during the week while I was in NYC. I can’t remember the last time I wasn’t with her to celebrate her birthday in person, although I was able to FaceTime and sing happy birthday.

This morning, my wife and I took the morning train from Bucks County, PA into NYC for my chemotherapy appointment. I was feeling a lot of pain this morning from the mouth sores and for the first time in my throat as well. I was miserable the entire train ride, but made it to New York and we headed to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) for treatment.

The day started with radiation therapy and then an appointment for blood work and then a meeting with Nicole – the nurse practitioner before starting chemotherapy. Last week when I met with her, she prescribed gabapentin and a lidocaine gel to help manage the pain. Today when I communicated my current pain level to her, she also prescribed Oxycodone. After about 30-minutes, the pain was improving and continued to do so throughout the next few hours with the Oxycodone. Nicole also mentioned that the steroids administered as part of the chemotherapy could also help with inflammation and might help alleviate the mouth and throat pain.

Chemotherapy (cisplatin) infusion pump

My chemotherapy was scheduled for 1pm, but the routine blood test came back with some bizarre readings in the metabolic panel. In fact, had the results been correct – the nurse said my heart would likely have stopped! Needless to say, they also couldn’t proceed with chemotherapy if the results were accurate. They needed to take another blood test to determine whether or not the readings were true. Not surprisingly, the first results were wrong and the second set was perfectly normal. As a result, the chemotherapy treatment proceeded – but not until around 2:30pm.

I finally finished chemotherapy at 7:45pm and Lorie and I went to a nearby restaurant for a late dinner before heading to the apartment. The second dose of Oxycodone left me feeling little pain and I actually had an appetite. It was the first time I felt comfortable going out to eat in more than three weeks. The French toast sounded like a good bet for some much needed calories and I ate the entire portion except for some of the crust. It was a fantastic end to a day that started off a little rough.

Tomorrow is the second day of chemotherapy and then I’m back to just daily radiation for the next few weeks. It will be interesting to see how I handle this round of chemotherapy as opposed to the first round when I came down with the flu.

Progress Report

Yesterday marked the beginning of Week #3 for my chemoradiation treatment. By now, the cummulative effects of daily radiation have started to appear.  This includes oral mucositis (where the mucosal lining of the mouth breaks down forming ulcers) and xerostomia (dry mouth). The World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Toxicity Scale measures anatomical, symptomatic, and functional components of oral mucositis¹. The scale ranges from Grade 0 (no oral mucositis) to Grade 4 (unable to eat solid food or liquids). The majority of head and neck cancer patients (83%) who are receiving radiation therapy develop oral mucositis and 29% develop severe oral mucositis².

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Oral mucositis ulcer on side of tongue

My current assessment would be WHO Grade 2, which means that I can still eat solid foods despite the presence of ulcers (see photo of the single ulcer on the side of my tongue). Recall that I started taking Caphosol® at the start of my chemoradiation treatment. This oral rinse has been shown to reduce the severity and duration of oral mucositis in a clinical study. The study design used a different oral mucositis scale devised by the National Institute of Dental andCraniofacial Research (NIDCR), which ranks oral mucositis on a 0-5 scale where I would presently be at Grade 2 (single ulcer <1 cm). Results from the study demonstrated a peak Grade 1.38 for patients using Caphosol compared to Grade 2.41 for the placebo group. Accordingly, it will be interesting to see whether or not I develop additional ulcers or more severe oral mucositis to help determine the benefit of using Caphosol.

I received a progress report during my appointment with Dr. Nancy Lee, my radiation oncologist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). The results are encouraging, as the tumor has markedly decreased in size over the first two weeks of therapy – characteristic for my type of cancer. The better news was that the PET imaging study looking at levels of oxygen deficiency (hypoxia) in the tumor tissue showed dramatic improvement. In particular, the pre-treatment scan showed “mild” radiotracer uptake in the primary tumor (right tonsil) and “intense” radiotracer uptake in the neck lymph node, indicating a significant amount of hypoxic tumor cells that are generally more resistant to radiation and many anticancer drugs. However, the most recent PET scan showed “no” radiotracer uptake in the primary tumor and only “mild” persistent uptake in the neck lymph node. Unfortunately, the fact that there is still some hypoxia means that they won’t be able to reduce the amount of radiation to the neck node, which could have reduced some of the side effects.

This morning I had my follow-up hearing test, which showed no change from pre-treatment.  This is also good news, as the chemotherapy (cisplatin) can sometimes cause hearing loss. Next week will be my second round of chemotherapy on both Monday and Tuesday. I’m hoping that this cycle will be less eventful than the first and that I don’t contract the flu or have any other surprises.

¹ World Health Organization. WHO Handbook for Reporting Results of Cancer Treatment. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization; 1979:15-22.

² Vera-Llonch M, Oster G, Hagiwara M, Sonis S. Oral mucositis in patients undergoing radiation treatment for head and neck carcinoma. Cancer. 2006;106:329–36.