Yesterday (Jan 18) was my first day of therapy. As expected, it was bittersweet. On one hand, it felt great to finally get started with attacking the disease. The flip side is knowing what lurks around the corner in terms of side effects.

Michael Becker in chemotherapy lounge at MSKCC

Michael Becker in chemotherapy lounge at MSKCC (click to enlarge)

The day started at 8:45am with bloodwork and consultation with a nurse to answer any remaining questions. Next was two hours of intravenous fluids, an hour of intravenous anti-nausea medications and kidney protection medication, an hour of intravenous chemotherapy, and then two more hours of intravenous fluids. Of the six hour total infusion time, the four hours of fluids cover flushing out the kidneys, which are at risk for damage from the chemotherapy.

The time actually passed quickly. My wife and I chatted throughout, had a small lunch, checked emails, etc. Not quite a day at the spa, but no unpleasant surprises. It’s so great having her by my side! Luvya babe.

The fun wasn’t over yet. Next was a shuttle bus to the radiation center for that component of the therapy. The radiation treatment is only about ten minutes, but there is setup time, changing clothes, etc. that take up about an hour total.

You do not feel anything during the radiation treatment.  The side effects come later, so literally you leave day one feeling emotionally drained but physically fine. The worst part of radiation treatment is that darn mask! The confining nature of the mask and being pinned to the table is more of a mental challenge than anything else.

Today (Tue), I woke up early at 5am feeling wide awake, which can be a side effect from the steroids they gave me. However, a short while later I started to get a bit nauseous. It was disturbing to see the chemotherapy side effect so soon after treatment, but I took a pill for nausea they prescribed and felt better after about 30-minutes.

My wife and I stopped for breakfast and I was able to order my favorite banana toast meal from Bluestone Lane and had some coffee as well. We then headed over to MSKCC for day two of chemoradiation.

For the next few weeks, I won’t have to do the 5-6 hour chemotherapy. During that period, I “simply” have daily radiation Monday-Friday. Then, around week three I go through the same two-day chemotherapy with radiation and the process repeats. The total treatment cycle is 6-7 weeks.

The biggest epiphany so far is that commuting to New York daily for both treatment and work is likely going to be too much. As a result, I’m getting a temporary apartment in NY for the next few months. Not a cheap solution, but a necessary one – especially when side effects start to appear around week three or four. Fortunately, family has been there to help offset the added and unforseen expenses (thanks again!).

Lastly, to everyone that posts on my Facebook page, comments on this blog, emails, texts me on my phone, etc. – I can’t tell you how much it means to me. The kind notes and supportive words really do keep my spirits high. Thank you!

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Join the conversation! 2 Comments

  1. Michael, I just wanted to touch base to let you know I’m keeping up with your posts. I know blogging is cathartic for you, but the information you are sharing could be so valuable to others. Your immense knowledge has already helped you with acquiring Caphosol, which is ironic but also a blessing. I believe you are doing everything you can to have a positive outcome. I wish you, with Lorie, Rosie, and Meg by your side, much strength in the weeks ahead!

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  2. Honestly can’t imagine what it’s like to be in that mask! I’m glad you found solution to that commute from PA to NY to alleviate the travel time to allow your body to rest! We need to use our editorial magic on your blog to get it views like your photography talents to help others going through similar experiences learn how to research treatments for themselves like you have!

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